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PUBLISHED ARTICLES

Accessing our expertise and linking into what others say about us

Achieving a flexible work environment - Judy Newgreen

At a recent forum to discuss the barriers that exist for women who pursueleadership roles l was asked how businesses can support a flexible work environment. Women in the workplace is a key diversity issue in Singapore. Whilst there are gains in female representation at all organisational levels, Singaporean women, like women worldwide, report that lack of flexibility to better manage professional and personal commitments is a significant barrier to senior leadership.

Global research provides an abundance of evidence identifying the benefits of men and women sharing organizational decision-making- and flexible work arrangements for all are well-documented as a solution to current and future generational and other diversity issues.

After 15 years training and consulting in the Asia-Pacific region and a heap of global research, I have identified The Five Essentials that, when demonstrated by management and team members, drive cultural change to support a flexible work environment

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For a copy of the full published article please contact us
   

The Southern Star, Australian Chamber Singapore

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Behavioural Interviewing: Tips to Hire The Right Person - Judy Newgreen

No-one sets out to hire the wrong person – it just happens!

Hiring staff is often costly, challenging and time-consuming.

The effect of making a hiring mistake can have a negative impact across an organisation, causing difficulties for team members and the manager who has responsibility for managing the new hire’s performance.

Making the right choice is as much about choosing the person who is the best fit with the team and the organisation, as it is with choosing the person who possesses the required knowledge and skills.

The interview is the key to a successful selection process.
Separating the right person from the wrong person is dependent upon planning and preparing to apply the ACD Right Choice Model™:

Ability – the knowledge (academic and experience-based) and the skills critical to performing the role 
Competency – the behaviours and the personal traits that support performing the role effectively
Desire – the motive to want to perform the role and share the values that govern acceptable behaviour in the organisation

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Flexibility is Not a FAD - Judy Newgreen

The global financial crisis may have presented a significant obstacle to the broad implementation of workplace flexibility across organisations however it is but a stumbling block. Flexibility is not a fad– it is the new way of work. 

Since those heady days of the so-called talent war (beginning around the year 2000) in which organisations fiercely competed for a limited supply of ‘best in their field’ professionals, and flexible working arrangements were recognised as significant to attraction and retention, much in the workplace has changed.

The pressure on managers to support flexible work arrangements has eased considerably as we note some return of a more directive, non-engaging style of management. Employees are frustrated by the lack of management initiatives. They suffer the need for some control over when and where they work but are fearful of requesting flexibility in an unstable work environment.
  
All the while, the impact of work-demands in the 21st century plays heavily on employee’s health, well-being and personal relationships, reducing their productivity and commitment.

The solution? Get flexibility back on the agenda.

This process can be difficult, however by mixing the ‘serious’ work tasks with some of the ‘pleasures of life’, improved outcomes are achieved

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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LifeMoves - A Joint Responsibility - Judy Newgreen

Life is dynamic.  We move to meet its demands, take up its opportunities and enjoy its pleasures.The moves we choose to make are best planned by identifying with our personal needs and values; best actioned in the workplace when managers support and promote flexible working arrangements.

Do I look stressed?  I was recently asked this question by an associate of a Hong Kong law firm while discussing work and life balance.  He didn’t look stressed but he did ‘feel’ stressed.  Longer working hours, high levels of pressure with no indication that it would ease, had impacted on his ability to cope and on his health.

Recent figures gathered from surveys in Hong Kong, China and Singapore indicate that work-related stress is increasing dramatically. The Q2 2007 Hudson Report found that 50% of Hong Kong respondents across all sectors, say that their employees have experienced higher levels of work-related stress over the past 12 months.  The findings of ‘The State of Work-Life Balance in Hong Kong Survey 2007’ were that over 60% of respondents reported prolonged fatigue and extreme tiredness; the same figure as 2006. Alarmingly, the Community Business findings further indicated that Hong Kong risks 27% of its workforce leaving the city if they can find better work-life balance elsewhere.

The consequences of a stressed workforce are well-documented: poor performance, lack of motivation, increased sick leave and high attrition rates all seriously affect levels of productivity and generate poor morale.

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Networking - The FAB Strategy - Ian Newgreen
Reprinted in India

Networking is serious business. Fierce competition across the business sector in Singapore and around the globe is forcing many professionals out of the office to interact face-to-face with clients and potential clients.

Lawyers at all levels of Singapore law firms are accountable to varying degrees for building the client base, achieving budget, billing set hours, servicing both internal and external clients, building strong working
relationships and presenting the ‘face’ of the business. To varying degrees, similar expectations are placed on lawyers working in-house.

All lawyers must complement their technical expertise with strong networking skills.

Networking is about building relationships and assisting people to get ‘what they want’ while getting you ‘what you want’. It is a fact that ‘givers gain’. Networking is not about acquiring as many business cards as you can, adding the contact details to your database and then bombarding contacts with information.

Networking links directly with marketing and image presentation. When you are networking you are in effect marketing your business. Presenting yourself well and selling the expertise of your business, establishes credibility, distinction and recognition – earning ‘fame’.

‘Be FABulously famous - Networking’ is a PRIORITY ONE TRAINING program with a  proven three part networking strategy in which lawyers learn to seriously network the FAB way -  Focused, Approachable and Believable.

HALSBURY'S law monthly India, Vol 01 Issue 02
Published by LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier India Pvt Ltd

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Networking - The FAB Strategy - Ian Newgreen

Networking is serious business. Fierce competition across the business sector in Singapore and around the globe is forcing many professionals out of the office to interact face-to-face with clients and potential clients.

Lawyers at all levels of Singapore law firms are accountable to varying degrees for building the client base, achieving budget, billing set hours, servicing both internal and external clients, building strong working
relationships and presenting the ‘face’ of the business. To varying degrees, similar expectations are placed on lawyers working in-house.

All lawyers must complement their technical expertise with strong networking skills.

Networking is about building relationships and assisting people to get ‘what they want’ while getting you ‘what you want’. It is a fact that ‘givers gain’. Networking is not about acquiring as many business cards as you can, adding the contact details to your database and then bombarding contacts with information.

Networking links directly with marketing and image presentation. When you are networking you are in effect marketing your business. Presenting yourself well and selling the expertise of your business, establishes credibility, distinction and recognition – earning ‘fame’.

‘Be FABulously famous - Networking’ is a PRIORITY ONE TRAINING program with a  proven three part networking strategy in which lawyers learn to seriously network the FAB way -  Focused, Approachable and Believable.

Law Gazette Singapore, an official publication of the Law Society of Singapore
Published by LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier(Singapore) Pte Ltd

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Successful Networking - building strong and trusting relationships - Ian Newgreen

Networking is an integral part of the Hong Kong professional’s daily work life. A highly competitive business environment demands that service delivery is supported by face-to-face interaction with clients and that relationships are fostered with prospective clients through personal interaction.

Successful networking is about building strong and trusting relationships that assist us to get ‘what we want’ while getting others ‘what they want’. It is a true saying that ‘givers gain’.

Networking links directly with the marketing of your organization and your image presentation. Presenting yourself as a professional and selling the expertise of your organisation, establishes credibility, distinction and recognition – earning both success and ‘fame’.

‘Be FABulously famous - Networking’ is a PRIORITY ONE TRAINING program with a  proven three part networking strategy in which professionals learn to seriously network the FAB way -  Focused, Approachable, Believable.

‘Focused’ is to clearly understand why you are networking and to know with whom you need to network. You focus on the benefits of networking to your organisation, what it is that you specifically need to achieve, and then target the ‘right’ people and the ‘right’ businesses. Decisions on the why, who and what, lead to planning when, where and how you will network.

Hong Kong has a multitude of networking opportunities.  Seek out associations, chambers of commerce and professional gatherings where people come together specifically for networking and to do business. Also choose to attend those organised business functions, such as conferences and seminars, which fit within your focus.

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

 

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VALUES IN ACTION - Judy Newgreen

“It’s not just about how much I’m paid for what I do; it’s ‘how’ I’m treated and regarded by the organisation I work for and the people I work with.” Spoken by Ms/Mr HighlyTalented Professional 2006

In an age where human capital has emerged as an organisation’s principal asset, organisations keenly compete to attract and retain highly talented professionals. Many of these professionals know they deserve to be well-rewarded and well-recognised for their expert knowledge and skill. What they want, and in fact are now demanding, is to be valued on a personal level.
 
Increasingly, talented professionals are searching out organisations that have high ethical standards and practices.  A powerful indicator of how organisations conduct their business is evidenced by the actioning of their values on the local and global stage.

Global studies confirm that organisations that ‘action’ their values, build a culture of trust and respect, distinguish themselves from their competitors and attract and retain highly talented professionals.

Well-supported and satisfied professionals are a committed and compelling force for performance excellence and organisational success.  

Formal organisational values such as integrity, respect, trust, caring, responsiveness and accountability are statements of intent. By establishing clear behavioural guidelines and expectations, they prescribe ‘how’ an organisation will achieve, or does achieve, its aspirations.

A comprehensive set of values can drive and support all human resource initiatives, provide greater clarity for people management and offer a positive and non-threatening means of discussing performance, behaviours and attitudes. Good diversity, work and life balance policies and decision making practices that are value driven, set an organisation at the forefront of their industry or profession.

In my experience organisational values are often well-defined, tailored specifically to the particular workplace and workforce, and underpin highly ‘doable’ and ‘workable’ people policies.  However, in practice, values are often poorly communicated, demonstrated and reinforced.

HRM Singapore
Published by KEY MEDIA PTE LTD

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Making Meetings Work - Ian Newgreen

‘Fantastic! A meeting!’ or ‘Not another meeting!’ Which do you most often hear? What do you most often feel?

Research conducted by PRIORITY ONE TRAINING has shown that a majority of professionals have a negative perception of meetings, resulting in pessimistic attitudes towards what can be and what will be achieved. 

Survey respondents were asked to describe their thoughts and feelings about attending an ‘event’.  Many responses were highly positive, for example, ‘worthwhile’, ‘something I want to do’, ‘motivating’ and ‘satisfying’.

We were alerted to the possibility that the word ‘meeting’ in itself elicits negative attitudes based on past experiences.  Let’s for a moment, call meetings ‘events’.

‘Must have’ meetings must be recognised as a ‘part of work’, not as time away from work.

Meetings that fully satisfy the needs of those attending and achieve the stated meeting objectives are a valuable investment in the profitability of an organisation and positively impact on organisational culture.

The principles of planning, conducting and achieving the objectives of a meeting are similar to that of an event.  Each needs to have an organiser/producer, a chairperson/director, and participants/performers.

Focus, The Official Journal of ACCA Singapore
Published by LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier(Singapore) Pte Ltd

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How to Deal with Difficult People - Difficult
may mean Different - Judy Newgreen

Very few people are difficult just because they want to be difficult. 

In every workplace across a broad range of professions and occupations people are confronted by attitudes and behaviours that they label as ‘difficult’ when dealing with their colleagues, clients and managers.

In dealing with difficult attitudes and behaviours it is crucial that we consider that difficult may mean ‘different’ if we are to work productively.

In conducting our training programs in Hong Kong and Australia, we at PRIORITY ONE TRAINING have identified five ‘differences’ that most often put people in conflict.
 
Different:

  • abilities to communicate and interact with others
  • personal values, interests and needs
  • skill and knowledge levels
  • use of sources of power
  • personalities

The use of the description ‘difficult’ to describe what are ‘differences’, in itself forms a barrier to dealing with the person and the situation.

In dealing with people that are ‘different’, follow the PRIORITY ONE TRAINING ‘Five – Point’ strategy.

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

 

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Work/Life Balance - "Get the Balance - Create Success"
- Judy Newgreen

Connie arrived home at half past seven in the evening. It had been a long day. From the moment Connie had walked into her office at seven o'clock that morning she hadn't stopped; Connie had attended several meetings, participated in conference calls and worked through a variety of issues relating to a large project she was managing.

Lunch had been a sandwich quickly eaten at her desk, so Connie was pleased to be arriving home to a relaxing dinner with her husband and children. However, just as she was about to sit at the dining room table, the phone rang. Connie's colleague assured her that the call would only take a short time, 'just a matter of clarifying contract details'. Two hours later Connie finished the call, her husband had put the children to bed and she sat down to eat her meal in front of the television.

Connie didn't complain. She knew her commitment to her organization was 24/7. Connie confirmed to herself that she was paid extremely well and enjoyed the challenges her work presented. However, she was often concerned that her work allowed her little time for her family; her friends; herself!

Connie's story, as related during a PRIORITY ONE TRAINING people development program conducted in Hong Kong, is a familiar one. Like Connie, people at all levels of many different organisations who have the ability, ambition and drive to succeed, are 'waking up' to the notion that they are losing control of their life.

Many suffer from over-exertion through their daily efforts to achieve what is demanded of them and what they demand of themselves. They are finding that their way of life is progressively becoming, or has become, unsustainable.

Often they are confused as to how they arrived at this imbalance, despite applying proven organisational, time and stress management strategies!

The fact is that people are being expected to work longer and harder as organisations fiercely compete in a global market and strive to increase productivity.

'Work-Life Balance' is a term that has become well-known and is defined in this article as 'the point at which an individual decides that their lifestyle - how they choose to spend their 24 hours or 1,440 minutes per day - is in line with their professional and personal values, needs and wants.

'Balance' is a fragile state, a harmonious arrangement that is not enduring. It is not the same for everyone. It is dynamic. You don't grab it with both hands and sit back content in the knowledge that you did it, 'you got the balance'! You plan, prepare and focus to arrive at a balance and then using the knowledge and skills gained, you manage commitments to work and life.

This rightly suggests that the individual does have choices; the option to take control of their life. But at what cost?

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

 

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Create an Experience - "Seeing is Believing"
- Ian Newgreen

Passion, vibrance, energy. Imagine a presentation radiating these feelings. Add subject expertise, credibility, charisma.

Take a moment to embrace these feelings and qualities; it's exhilarating - it's a highly professional presentation.

Many a presenter sets out to deliver excellence and professionalism, however quite often the audience is bombarded and overloaded with information - in conjunction with the ubiquitous use of PowerPoint - delivered with little emotion and feeling, leaving the audience less than satisfied.

The importance of imparting the information totally overrides how the information is presented to meet the audiences' expectations.

The Banking Industry of Hong Kong promotes strong values and high expectations of service: reward achievement, having the best people, integrity, innovation and commitment to quality and competence; the one I really like is 'seeing is believing'.

Strong values and high expectations must be supported by the behaviours we 'see' in action and delivering a highly professional presentation is a powerful demonstration of the Banking industry's excellence.

I will address three essentials of a highly professional presentation: the rehearsal, meeting the expectations of the audience and linking into the feelings and emotions of the audience to deliver an 'experience'.

Journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Bankers
Published by LexisNexis (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Make training a dynamic exhilarating learning experience - Ian Newgreen

Have you been to the new Hong Kong Disneyland? It's an experience I can vividly recall.

I was attracted to the 3D animated movie featuring a number of Disney characters led by Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse.

Visual and audio stimuli created a sense of excitement as I waited in the theatre foyer; the 3D glasses I held in my hand set high expectations for what I was about to experience.

Shooting a movie in 3D gives the viewer a sense of depth; the senses of the audience were bombarded as characters and props zoomed out and around us. We were covered with a fine mist of water and the aroma of freshly baked bread wafted through the theatre.

I was totally engaged. It was not about the characters in isolation but a shared exhilarating experience.

Effective training is training that is totally engaging. It's through involvement in the process and the process of involvement (an exhilarating shared experience), that learning is achieved.

The term 'experiential training' describes training in which the trainer facilitates the learning process through involving the participants in specifically designed activities; participants 'experience' the joy of learning through the 5 senses (touch, smell, sight, sound and taste) practising and rehearsing the introduced skills and behaviours.

Experiential training methods have been shown to reinforce the participants' long term retention of the learning; generating and promoting workplace skill application.

Effective experiential training requires strong planning and preparation. It is not about activity upon activity but training that energetically promotes and recognises the learners' input into the learning process, balances participants' needs with those of the workplace and is totally focussed on achieving objectives.

I offer three questions for consideration when planning and preparing an experiential training program:

1. Who are the participants?
2. What do the participants need to learn?
3. How will the learning be delivered to the participants?

Each question impacts one upon the other and each evokes advice to DO and not to do (DON'T).

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Meetings that WORK - Ian Newgreen

Christine Yuan, IT Manager, is about to attend a scheduled managers' meeting. The meeting has been time-framed. Christine has set aside the time, knows where and when the meeting will take place, who will attend, and has been informed of the meeting structure and the objectives to be achieved. Christine has had input into the agenda, is fully conversant with her role within the meeting, and has prepared accordingly. Christine's past experiences of management meetings suggest to her that they are valuable and stimulating interactions in which decisions are made, action responsibilities allocated, objectives achieved and all within the time allocated.

Reflection
How do you think Christine feels?
Why does Christine feel the way she does?
What is the likely culture of the organisation?

Meetings are an integral part of day to day business and must be seen as a 'part of work', not as taking people away from work. Whether meetings are one-on-one client, management or team, they must satisfy the needs of those who attend and achieve the stated meeting objectives.

A meeting that satisfies needs and achieves objectives, is a valuable investment in the profitability of the organisation and positively impacts on the organisational culture.

Over several years, I have been conducting training programs to significantly improve the 'process' and the 'result' of meetings.
I have accumulated many examples of situations where meetings do not satisfy needs or achieve objectives. In other words they do 'not work'.

The following is a selection of the statements that professionals have made when asked to comment on the problems they face in the meetings they conduct and/or attend:

difficult to give a new idea instantly
one person dominates, others defer, how do you reach a balanced input
unable to get to the issue at hand, keep group focussed and motivated
people who don't support the outcomes
participants feeling that they are not important to the meeting
too many different ideas
 

These problems cover a cross section of meeting issues such as planning, facilitation, performing and evaluating.

At the outset it must be stated that meetings should only occur if it is the best option available in order to achieve the objectives. If face-to-face interaction is important in the process, then a meeting it is!

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)


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Performance Management - Deserving of an Image Makeover
- Judy Newgreen

"So much of my time is being taken up with performance issues. I need to be able to get on with some real work." Pauline Chan, Manager.

"I'm so worried about discussing my performance. I've got no idea what I'm meant to do and what I will say if I'm asked about losing that customer account early in the year." Stephen Lee, Staff person.

The trials and tribulations of managing performance?

Whether you are able to empathise with Pauline Chan and Stephen Lee or not, their comments are representative of real points of view on performance management and a tool of the system - performance appraisal.

An image problem

Performance management suffers an image problem in many organisations as management and staff have difficulty in understanding what it is and how it 'works', struggle with the processes of performance appraisal and fail to appreciate the benefits of an effective system.

What's in a name? 'Performance Management' is a common organisational term which I describe as 'chunky' because it represents many different systems and processes across organisations. Without a common understanding, the term in itself causes confusion and discord which I believe has contributed to giving performance management a poor image.

Furthermore, performance appraisal is sometimes wrongly interpreted as an alternative name synonymous with performance management, bringing about confusion between what is a tool of the system, with the system itself.

In an effort to clarify and unify meaning and in so doing improve its image, many organisations have re-named their performance management systems to include performance appraisal terminology: Staff Development System, Performance Review and Enhancement Program, and Performance and Development Review, to name a few.

However, name changes alone don't 'put a positive spin on a system'. In fact significant process changes or even total system re-structures have often failed to lift the image of performance management.

This is not to say that there are not some excellent performance management systems operating, that are exerting a positive impact on people and productivity. I believe that significant to a positive image is the clear definition and communication of 'what it is and how it works'!

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Creativity: The little picture
– Ian Newgreen

Have U moved a chair lately - really moved it!
Have U sat on top of your office desk to work - really worked!
Have U explored a room - really explored it!
Have U initiated a conversation with a stranger in an elevator - really conversed!

Your answers are important.

The catchcry of the business world today is innovation. To be innovative is to be creative, to seek out different and better ways to produce a product, to provide a service, be more effective, be more efficient and to be ……………………………… (whatever U would like to write).

To accomplish such aspirations we sometimes incorrectly focus on the ‘big picture’ to the exclusion of the ‘little picture’. To be innovative begins at the beginning. One change can be so powerful as to make the difference between ultimate success and failure, growth and decline, creation and destruction.
The Xciting fact is that we can all be creative. Small changes are the leveraging point into being innovative. Stepping out to be different and thinking differently is liberating, stimulating and FANTASTIC fun.

The empirical evidence I have acquired, whilst conducting thought provoking, challenging, totally outcome focussed training courses for business organizations, is that no matter who the person is or what their role, they will learn and acquire new practical workplace skills when having FUN - just like children do.

The well-known saying that ‘adults are just children in big bodies’ is without doubt so true.

As I observe training program attendees participating in the drawing of a masterpiece, using a rope to tie a session together, utilizing a piece of fruit to describe themselves and their job function, becoming parts of a human machine, I witness a truly magical experience - people being creative………"

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Get the balance - Judy Newgreen

Are you prepared to take on a challenge? You are? It won’t be easy!

To succeed you must:

- be totally honest with yourself
- question your beliefs and those of others
- listen to learn something ‘you don’t know’
- identify your personal and professional values and search relentlessly to discover new ways of thinking

If you’re ready……here we go!

As we move in a global marketplace forging our way into the 21st century our lives have never been busier. The demands on our time are omnipresent as we daily strive to meet workplace targets and project deadlines, conduct and attend meetings, manage people, catch flights and focus on a multitude of issues that require short term and long term strategies and solutions.

Now let’s add to that, time spent focussing on self-fulfilment and professional development; being innovative, proactive, a motivator of others, a mentor and a coach.

And again, let’s add to that, our need to spend quality time with friends and family, have time alone, be a husband, wife, partner, parent, son, daughter and friend, go to the gym, play golf……

You may be able to add to the list of demands on your time and the above is not intended to be prioritised in any way. The implication is that living life to the fullest can be testing and to consider and reflect on the choices you have made, the patterns of behaviour you have developed, is the challenge that this article sets for you.

You may be familiar with the term Work/Life Balance. This article will discuss possible ways to define work and life balance, present some common trends of thinking that I have encountered in my research on the topic, and provide a 5-point approach to evaluating and committing to a work and life balance……

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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Grab them with your Professional Presentation - Ian Newgreen

“I would rather die than stand up in front of a group of people and speak”.

By implication – “I would rather be in the coffin than presenting the eulogy”.

So why do people make such statements? Their reasons are many and reflect genuine concerns.

My experience suggests that people become so fixated on ‘what’ they are going to say to the exclusion of ‘how’ they are going to say it.

People are employed for their knowledge and expertise, both attributes acquired through the process of study and practical ‘hands on’ workplace application.

The same applies to learning the skills of presenting.

Myth
Having subject knowledge means you know how to impart information to an audience of one or more people

Reality
A different skill set is needed to effectively engage your audience and transfer information

Myth
The subject matter is boring and so the presentation will be boring

Reality
No subject is boring - it is how the information is presented that makes the difference

‘Winning Presentations - the Edge’, a PRIORITY ONE TRAINING, training program asks the attendees to write on flipcharts, ‘WHAT GRABS ME’ and ‘WHAT TURNS ME OFF’, when they attend a presentation.

Overwhelmingly the comments relate to the ‘HOW’ the subject matter is delivered, yet most people attend a presentation because of the subject……

The official journal of the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management
Published by LexisNexis Butterworths (a division of Reed Elsevier (Greater China) Ltd)

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